An E-Mail from Chief Judge Easy Rider

The Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is nothing if not a character. Here is the email I just received announcing the CA9′s new oral argument video program, which is about to get underway:

Subject:    Today at 2pm
From:       The Easy Rider [alex@kozinski.com]
To:            Friends of the 9th ‎[alex@kozinski.com]‎
Date:        Monday, December 09, 2013 12:46 PM

Here’s the link for our first-ever streamed oral argument.

http://goo.gl/vd1Uov

This case is Haskell v. Harris and the issue is whether the state may take DNA samples of individuals arrested for felonies.

We want to give our video feed a stress test, so I hope you’ll be able to watch.

If you can’t watch today’s video, we have other streamed en bancs later in the week. The link is here

http://goo.gl/SN4pPq

If you have any comments or suggestions–about the video, NOT the substance of the cases–I would love to hear them.

Ciao.  AK

And that’s it. The “Ciao,” the “To:” line, the simple plain-language email. Good stuff. Also, I’m quite pleased to be included among the “Friends of the 9th!”

Law Reviews, Peer Review, and Cheese Knives

According to Professor Christopher Zorn of Empirical Legal Studies, law reviews are “terrible.” And he presents a list of grievances. I’ll get to those, and I’ve already discussed some of the recent “State of the Law Reviews” discussion here and here. But before the grievances, a more fundamental point: Professor Zorn doesn’t make clear his understanding of the purpose of law reviews so it’s impossible to judge whether law reviews are “terrible” or “great” at satisfying that purpose. You can’t call a cheese knife “terrible” just because you have a hard time cutting steak with it.

Let’s say the purposes of law reviews are to (1) get a bunch of ideas out into the universe, with a reliance on post-publication evaluation and sorting, (2) provide information that is useful to the bench, the bar, and scholars in some ratio, (3) have an article’s sourcing and arguments thoroughly checked by student editors, who effectively serve as volunteer student research assistants, and (4) give law students the opportunity to work closely with professors on current scholarship. On those fronts, I would say the law reviews are doing a decent job. But here are Five Reasons Law Reviews Are Terrible, according to Professor Zorn, with my comments: Continue reading

A Sur-Reply to the Replies to My Response to Adam Liptak’s NYT Article on Law Reviews

Yes, that title is supposed to be a joke.

Anyway, a few additional thoughts in response to folks who commented on my initial post defending law reviews from the students’ perspective.

Even with Student Editors, There Should Still Be Peer Review!

Lots of folks have pointed out that peer review would be a useful supplement to student editors. I didn’t mention this in the original post, because others had already discussed it elsewhere, but peer review does happen in legal scholarship. There are, of course, plenty of peer-reviewed journals. But even in the context of student-edited journals, Matt Bodie and Will Baude note that much of legal scholarship’s peer-reviewing happens after publication, when scholars, courts, and practitioners can evaluate a piece, ignore it, cite it, engage with it, criticize it, etc. What’s the problem with that?

Also, there is actually a good amount of pre-publication peer review. People complain about star footnotes—that little footnote after an author’s name thanking all the famous professors and friends who provided comments and edits on previous drafts. Sure, some of that might be an attempt at status-by-affiliation. But it’s also peer review! I’ve yet to see a star footnote that reads: “So, uh… nobody else in the field has read this yet. I just sort of read a bunch of cases and articles and these are my thoughts. I hope they’re not terribly obvious or wrong-headed.”

Blogs Are Better than Law Reviews!

Sure! Blogs are great! Continue reading

In Defense of Law Reviews: The Students’ Perspective

Okay, the title of this post is a bit misleading, since I am not a law student. But I was once a law student, and I do think law students are important! The interests of law students, however, have been largely absent from the debate surrounding Adam Liptak’s The Lackluster Reviews That Lawyers Love to Hate, which has instead focused on judges (“Law reviews are useless!”), professors (“The process is irrational!”), and folks from other disciplines (“Wait, who selects and edits your scholarship?!?).

If you’re new to this week’s version of the Great Law Review Debate, you can find a nice round-up at UW’s Gallagher Blog here and here. I’ll try to avoid repeating what others have already said. Perhaps the best (or at least most enjoyable) statement of the case against law reviews is Fred Rodell’s anticipatory eulogy for law reviews, published in 1936. (Tellingly, Rodell’s farewell to law reviews was published in the Virginia Law Review, and we’re still talking about it today.) During a prior iteration of the Great Debate, way back in 2011, Matt Bodie refreshingly addressed the student side of the equation in this piece. But the interests of law students seem to be largely absent from this iteration. So here goes…

The Students’ Role in the Law Review Process

Law professors are supposed to teach law students. That’s actually one of the things we get paid to do. Continue reading

What My Readers Want: More Posts About Shoes

I try to keep this blog focused on legal analysis, but I know what really drives pageviews–fashion! To this day, one of my most-read posts was this little blurb about a lawyer fashion show featuring “peep-toe shoes.” So I’m going back to that well one more time.

Kitten-heeled wedge

Last Friday, the Washington State Bar Association Blog posted an article entitled “Fun and Professional Shoes for Women Lawyers.” Feel free to make your views known in the comments. I think Marya’s “kitten-heeled wedge” is my favorite.

The End of Racism! (a/k/a A Lump of Coal from SCOTUS Claus!)

Well, SCOTUS Claus left us a stocking full of coal this morning in Shelby County v. Holder. I’m not going to do a full analysis of the case, since other people have already done a much better job of that than I ever could. (I’m talking about you, SCOTUSblog, and your already-posted five articles and forthcoming Shelby reaction symposium.) But here’s the short-short summary, followed by some specific questions/thoughts:

coal in stocking

Continue reading

Baseball Sues Biogenesis for Tortious Interference with Contract

Hello baseball fans and contract law fans! (That would be an interesting Venn diagram.) Anyway, this morning Major League Baseball sued Biogenesis (among others) for allegedly tortiously interfering with the “Joint Drug Agreement” between MLB and the MLB Players Association. The basic theory is (1) that MLB and the MLBPA have a contract pursuant to which the players agree not to use drugs and (2) that Biogenesis interfered with that contract by giving drugs to certain players.

Bonds & Steroids

Craig Calcaterra is one of my favorite baseball writers–and he also happens to be a former lawyer. He’s got a post up at NBC’s Hardball Talk in which he helpfully provides a copy of MLB’s Complaint; he concludes that the “lawsuit is crazy on its face” and “should be thrown out of court.” Indeed, Calcaterra is “shocked Major League Baseball found someone who would file it.”

Well, I’m not so sure… Continue reading

Lawyers Dress for Success!

I’ve spent a lot of time analyzing cases and commenting on legal issues here on this blog. However, my most popular post ever may well be this post about a lawyer fashion shoot over at the WSJ.

In keeping with that theme, I was happy to find a chapter on lawyer fashion while reading through The Curmudgeon’s Guide to Practicing Law by Mark Herrmann.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51HZy-UrKeL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

And because I know you love lawyer fashion, and because my goal is to give readers what they want, I’ve taken the liberty of posting, in its entirety, Chapter 8 of Herrmann’s book entitled “Dress for Success.” Full chapter after the jump: Continue reading