My Review of The Bluebook: The Reviews Are In!

Well, our long national nightmare is over. The Spring 2017 volume of the Journal of Legal Education has hit the digital newsstands; this volume includes my review essay on the latest edition of every lawyer’s favorite citation guide, The Bluebook. Early reviews of my essay have been uniformly… mediocre:

“[David Ziff] reviews the Bluebook”
Ryan Calo, UW School of Law

“Why?”
— 
Cristian Farias, Huffington Post

“Everybody knows The Bluebook sucks. What this article presupposes is—maybe it doesn’t?”
Ron FisherLatham & Watkins

“I nearly puked but I’ll still read it”
Sasha Moss, R Street Institute

“Scariest thing I’ve seen today… by far!”
Eric Segall, Georgia State University College of Law

“Anyone who wrote a 27 page book review of the Bluebook is not to be trusted.”
Jim Tyre, Electronic Frontier Foundation

Okay, so maybe those reviews are not great. But I’m pretty sure they were offered in the playful spirit shared by the essay itself. Seriously. I figured I couldn’t take myself too seriously while writing a 27-page book review of a legal citation manual. So while I certainly intended the essay to raise some important issues, I also tried to make it a fun read. I hope you enjoy it!

Everybody Hates The Bluebook: An Example

I’m taking a break from post-election thoughts to write about something much less upsetting: The Bluebook. I recently wrote a 27-page book review of the 20th Edition. Seriously. You should check it out.

In the review, I argue that many critiques of The Bluebook don’t critique the actual book. Rather, they seem to be upset about something altogether different, with The Bluebook just providing an easy target for their scorn.

An instant classic of the genre appeared today in Above The Law. An in-house lawyer offers a recommendation to future in-house lawyers: “Burn Your Bluebook.” Yikes! Look, I admit I’ve never worked as in-house counsel. And I wouldn’t be surprised if in-house lawyers rarely used The Bluebook. But the complaints in the article have almost nothing to do with The Bluebook. You could burn (or not burn) pretty much anything and you’d have just as much of an effect on the problems outlined in the article, since the author’s dispute is not with The Bluebook as a citation guide. Rather, the author seems to dislike providing any legal authority whatsoever in his memoranda. That’s fine! But that has nothing to do with The Bluebook, which contains rules to follow for when you do want to cite to legal authority in your memoranda. Continue reading